1. SEED and SWITCH-Africa Green are pleased to invite applications for our upcoming SAG-SEED Replicator Connect Workshops in Mauritius and Uganda.
  2. SEED was invited to attend the Second Green Economy Forum for Latin American and the Caribbean, 26-27 April 2017.
  3. SEED and SWITCH-Africa Green invite you to apply for the next round of the Starter Months (July-September) in Kenya, Ghana, Uganda and South Africa.
  4. SEED and SWITCH-Africa Green are pleased to invite applications for our upcoming SAG-SEED Replicator Connect Workshops in Uganda, Kenya, Ghana and South Africa.
  5. At SEED, we have been working with a number of successful Clean Cookstove enterprises: Nishant Bioenergy, WANA Solutions, Awamu, 5 Star Stoves and Greenway Grameen Infra, to explore pathways in expanding their reach and impact beyond their locality, region or country.
  6. In April 2017, eight SAG – SEED Replicator Connect Workshops were implemented in Accra, Pretoria, Nairobi, Kisumu and Kampala.
  7. The SEED South Africa Symposium 2017 was held on April 19-20 in Pretoria and brought together a variety of stakeholders.
  8. Have you ever heard of Burkina Faso’s “Green Brigade”? Picture teams of dozens of women regularly cleaning the streets of Burkina Faso’s capital Ouagadougou at dawn! Many urban dwellers in the country’s capital have testified for the positive contribution of the green brigade to the cleanliness of the city.
  9. Imagine thousands of low-income women farmers whose lands are degraded and infertile because of overuse. How can they continue farming to provide for their children and families?
  10. As one of 15 selected “Green Economy Pioneers” SEED was invited to demonstrate its innovative approaches.
  11. The deadline for the Replicator in Ghana & South Africa has been extended to Thursday, 16 March!
  12. SEED and SWITCH-Africa Green are pleased to invite applications for SAG-SEED Replicator Connect Workshops in Kenya and Uganda.
  13. SEED and SWITCH-Africa Green are pleased to invite applications for SAG-SEED Replicator Connect Workshops in Ghana and South Africa.
  14. “For every challenge society encounters, there is always an opportunity that presents itself. But we waste a lot of time crying over the challenge and we miss the opportunity.” This statement means a lot to Otim George William, CEO and Co-Founder of Tii Kikomi Cassava Commercial Growers (TCCG)...
  15. SEED has opened the call for applications for 15 SWITCH Africa Green (SAG) – SEED Awards for enterprises in Burkina Faso, Ghana, Kenya, Mauritius, South Africa and Uganda.
  16. Time for the second cohorts: Switch Africa Green and SEED announce today a call for applications for the second rounds of the Starter Months in both Ghana and Uganda.

  17. Along the coast of Kenya, just north of Mombasa, the Watamu National Marine Park and Reserves grace the coastline. In recent years, however, Watamu has struggled with increased solid waste pollution.
  18. With this year’s theme of the World Food Day on October 16th, the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) chose a strong message that tackles key issues of our modern global society. Indeed, climate, energy and agriculture are all interconnected.
  19. “There is no problem in Africa that nobody has thought about. Use those ideas!” said Ndubuisi Ekekwe from the African Institute of Technology two weeks ago at the SEED Africa Symposium in Nairobi. And, Jukka Uosukainen from the Climate Technology Centre and Network added: “Take the best innovations of the world and copy them. Let's start copying. I love it!”
  20. It is a challenge to transition to a low carbon economy while improving the well-being of the world’s nine billion people. By replicating proven solutions, positive impact from eco-inclusive enterprises can spread, and facilitate the transition to a low carbon economy while also improving social conditions as set in the SDGs.
  21. “[Entrepreneurship] puts rising economies on the path to prosperity and empowers people to come together and tackle our most pressing global problems, from climate change to poverty. When people can start their own businesses, it helps individuals and families succeed."
  22. The first steps as a startup are the hardest, especially for eco-inclusive startups in emerging markets. It all comes down to the right spirit and lion-hearted attitude.
  23. Agriculture still plays an essential role in the economy, and particular for employment on the African continent. Mozambique is no exception. In 2011, the agricultural sector contributed to almost one-third of the country’s GDP and provided a living for 80% of the working population.
  24. This past month, it was India’s turn, as SEED hosted an event around investment in the low-carbon, green SME sector.  Whilst it’s fair to say that every region and country has its own challenges, it remains surprising how similar the discussion is and how clearly certain interventions are necessary in order to make the green SME space both more resilient and scalable.
  25. Worldwide heaps of waste are expected to double by 2015 according to the World Bank. The majority of it is burned, dumped into landfills or ends up in our oceans. The small minority of the waste we are producing is taken for what it really is: an important resource.
  26. Every child in the world has the right to access high-quality early childhood care and education, and every woman deserves the opportunity to participate in the workforce and generate income, free of concern that their child may not be cared for properly.
  27. Financing! 20k-200k USD is needed for the ‘missing middle’ is one of ten critical aspects that SEED emphasises as crucial for the growth of SMMEs.
  28. Is it not time that we start to build green technology development capacity in developing countries?
  29. When I was in Nairobi a few weeks ago, our team at SEED brought together more than 500 people at our 2015 SEED Africa Symposium to discuss the latest developments in social and environmental entrepreneurship.
  30. "Then the refugees came and started to cut down trees and soon there was no forest left, (..) The locals also chopped trees and made charcoal to sell to the refugees."  (UNHCR, 1996)